Explore the fresh art work of our juried, distinguished artists and writers

View the full bodies of work, artist profiles and art pricing in the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal magazine issues. For commission and purchase inquiries, contact artists directly.

Introducing the artists and writers of the “Gardens” issue of ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal:

ArtAscent Gold Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Lev. L Spiro

ArtAscent Gold Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Behind what appear to be blurred, obscure images, mysteries, meanings, and inner fears are hidden. Lev L. Spiro exploits the darkness in his photographs to let the light leak out.

In his photographic series Fugitive Light, Lev aims to capture glimpses of ephemeral beauty. It is not literal in its depictions of landscapes or natural elements. Instead, it grasps at the impressions nature evokes. A plant wet with dew, a staircase running through a secret garden, exotic plants shrouded in darkness; Lev’s photos offer quick snapshots of a larger and more complex scenario. The gardens immortalized in his photos seem almost like shelters, places to escape into. According to Lev, the overwhelming darkness that characterizes his images reflects his unconscious fears and desire to shape and sublimate them. Light, as the title suggests, is something fugitive, a fleeting idea, never able to completely illuminate the composition.

Conclave, Portal, and Augury are just some of the photographs from the series contributing to a forest of symbols, of imperceptible correspondences which reveal something unexpected in the dim light. Lev’s gardens are visions that take up the task of the nature of wonder, but also speak, through metaphors. As a photographer, Lev’s technique is one of waiting for the right moment and then seizing it; there is little post-manipulation of the imagery, an inclination he shares with many of the great masters, including Henri Cartier Bresson, whose photography he admires. From a conceptual point of view, Lev’s works are closer to those of photographer Minor White, sharing a mystical atmosphere, an almost abstract vision of the image to be grasped through feeling rather than thought. Lev also names as influences photographers Susan Burnstine and Eddie Soloway, with whom he studied.

An established film and television director, Lev L. Spiro has directed episodes of Orange is the New Black, The O.C, Ugly Betty, and Gilmore Girls. Now devoting all of his creative energy to his photography, he enjoys the artistic exercise of focusing on a single, necessary, inspiring image. His series Fugitive Light was selected for numerous group exhibitions around the U.S. in 2020 and 2021.

Lev. L Spiro is the Gold Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for artists. To see the full body of work and profile, get a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.levlspiro.com

ArtAscent Gardens exhibition Gold Writer

Gabriel Griffin

The summer that was, the garden that might have been

Where oleanders scrawled over the hill falling
from the ruined wasn’t a castle but could’ve been in spite
or idiot pictures splattered over the upstairs no-stair
walls and the boys didn’t do them, that’s for sure!…

An abandoned garden, the ruins once populated by human presence, and the idea of what could have been and instead was not: this is the bitter feeling that Gabriel Giffin’s poetry leaves with the reader.

It is difficult to remain indifferent to Gabriel’s descriptive and evocative The summer that was, the garden that might have been. In his verses, you can perceive the sultry heat of an Italian summer, the noisy background of cicadas and bees. You can physically imagine a garden that is anything but luxuriant, but which deeply inspired the author. The poet is fascinated by a desolate and decadent garden, its crumpled oleander petals on the ground, and its ruins. He associates this powerful natural imagery with a painful memory, the abrupt end of youth, broken by a sudden accident. The garden then becomes a metaphor for youth that could have been as vital as a garden of delights but has turned into a shady and perishable one. Reading it, you feel the cold envelop you in the torrid and light-hearted summer.

Gabriel’s poetry is a meditation on loss, but above all on the crumbling power of time that passing. The topos of transience that takes away youth, beauty, and life renders his texts into a sort of literary still life. Like a Flemish still life painting of perishing of fruit in a wicker basket, wrapped in shadow and obscurity, the poet tells of life and death through the image of nature, which regains its space and its right to decay. From a stylistic and formal point of view, Gabriel’s poetry reflects the content of his verses. He captures the urgency, the vitality, the exuberance of youth with a fast rhythm, and at the same time offering sudden ruptures, abrupt interruptions, as in the lives of those the poet describes.

The close poetic relationship with nature recalls Emily Dickinson and her backyard garden, in which insects and blooms, flowers and vegetables, were observed obsessively, embodying metaphors of life and memories. Similarly, Gabriel cites John Keats among his literary references; like the Keatsian Greek urn sanctioning the changing and doomed destiny of the human being and youth and the imperishable nature of beauty through art, themes also manifest in Gabriel’s works.

Gabriel Griffin is the only inhabitant of a small island in Lake Orta, Northern Italy, where he writes in peaceful isolation and organizes annual festivals and literature events. An award-winning poet and author, his work has been featured in several anthologies. His poetry speaks of colours stolen from a dream, and of a garden that will never be again.

Gabriel Griffin is the Gold Writer of the ArtAscent Gardens call for writers. To see the full body of work and profile, get a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.gabrielgriffin.org

ArtAscent Silver Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Dina Torrans

ArtAscent Silver Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Dina Torrans explores the world through new perspectives. She creates forms and shapes inspired by her everyday life and discoveries. For her, she says, “each moment is a once in a lifetime experience.” Her work brings us on a realistic journey to our imagination. Dina’s work is inspired by the presence of nature in and around us. Finding beauty and curiosity in the little things, such as a simple stroll through the forest. Her approach to sculpture can motivate and inspire the spectators to see the little things, to witness the tiny miracles: a flower fighting its way out of concrete in the busy city or even a plant in our home blooming, growing, and ever-changing.

Pure nature is stunning and healing but in our society we are often not surrounded by this deep part of our world. This does not mean, though, that we cannot find it in our everyday lives. Dina shows us how to see new and old wonders of our existence and that we do not need a big hit by the universe to be inspired by it. It can be a simple red bug with black dots climbing its way up to a better view, or a plant letting its seed find the ground to continue the circle of growth. Dina’s work brings memories to life of children playing in the woods and absorbing all the wonderful distractions of nature, seeing a very special plant, and wanting to carry it home and observe it with a magnifying glass. Dina manages to merge preciseness with the freedom of experiencing life.

This playfulness is also visible in Cy Twombly’s work. Cy Twombly was an artist from the United States who contributed to an art movement that was born from the Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s. His work can be described as colourful happenings, like games between the artist and his material. Painting and sculptures that make the spectator curious and lead the way to an inner-child experience of being absorbed by the moment, forgetting time and place. These details can also be found in Dina’s sculptures. They are absorbing and open doors to an imaginary mindset. Looking at her work is a fairy-tale story on its own.

Dina Torrans is a Toronto-based artist and has been working in multimedia arts for more than 25 years. She graduated from the Art Centre at Central Technical School in Toronto and has received multiple awards throughout her career. Her large body of work has been exhibited in multiple solo and juried group exhibitions at various galleries, notably the Canadian Sculpture Centre, Fischtein Fine Art, John B. Aird Gallery, Elaine Fleck Gallery, and Artscape Toronto. Her work is included in many private and public collections internationally.

Dina Torrans is the Silver Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for artists. To see the full body of work and profile, get a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

http://www.dinatorrans.art

ArtAscent Bronze Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Luba Holland

ArtAscent Bronze Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

One of the most popular sayings about gardens is a quote by Janet Kilburn Phillips: “There are no gardening mistakes, only experiments.” The same is true for art, inspiring painters like Luba Holland in their visual experiments and subject studies.

The idea of a garden is multifaceted and seems to resonate with the profound urges of the contemporary world. It is no coincidence it became the subject for several recent art festivals, like Manifesta 12’s 2018 concept The Planetary Garden: Cultivating Coexistence and the Riga International Biennale of Contemporary Art’s 2020 edition and suddenly it all blossoms. Looking at the whole world as a complex intertwining of different systems that depend on each other, artists and critics are drawn to the fragile and powerful essence of gardens.

Born in Russia, with its old folklore traditions rooted in the poetization of natural phenomena, Luba also seeks to depict the interaction between micro and macro levels of life. “The worlds of plants and humans are inseparable,” Luba says. “We are one, we grow each other, within each other. Garden is not just the place outside we come to rest, enjoy, and contemplate nature, but the place within our minds and souls, which we create for our spiritual recumbence, or for peaceful and invigorating retreat, for meditation or as a place to hide from the outside world.”

Luba sees her acrylic canvases as visual allegories of different states of the human soul, represented through images that often refer to female fairy figures from Slavic mythology. She attempts to capture the sense of enigma through the combination of realistic elements, linearity, and abstract background, shaped with fluid watercolour effects. Believing in the therapeutic, harmonizing power of art, she chooses a vibrant, intensive palette which, together with the transparent, simple (even somewhat naïve) manner of painting, is reminiscent of the art of batik and its masters, like Sarkasi Said. Similar to batik, Luba’s works have a decorative quality, leaving an impression of contemplating the surrounding world with one’s eyes wide open.

Luba Holland is a Russian-born artist who currently resides in Germany. She studied at the College of Art in her hometown Kazan, later entering the local Architectural Academy, where she majored in Interior Design from 1994-2000. When the move to a foreign country unwillingly put her design career on hold, she focused on her painting and drawing practice. Since 2006 she has lived in Munich, working as an artist and freelance art and drawing teacher. Her works have been internationally exhibited in Switzerland, Belgium, the Netherlands, North Macedonia, India, South Korea, Iran, and the United States, and are included in collections in Germany, the United Kingdom, South Korea and Australia.

Artist Statement

In my art I try to depict things that exist beyond physical tangible substances. What becomes important is the inner world of a person. In my imagination I travel around the world of untamed emotions, whether calm or hysterical, but sincere, trying to give them physical expression through shapes and colours. Like donors’ blood, my artwork “infuses”; the viewer with emotions, reminding them of the human ability to feel. As a donor of emotion, I am being revitalized myself through this process again and again with each artwork. Cultivating beauty and creativity is part of my essence.

About My Work

In my art I engage in investigation and interpretation of deep spiritual values, such as love, wisdom, virtue, justice, freedom, as well as the inner cosmos of a person, unity with primal roots and nature, and the fragility of its existence.

In my recent works I have steered toward creating VISUAL ALLEGORIES, painting-stories with multiple meanings. By evoking the question “What if?” art has the power to shift paradigms. Through imagination and hyperbole, paintings turn reality into fantasy, our contemporaries are reincarnated as heroines of folk tales, and often back again. What if…I was a Sirin? What if…the Blue Bird was captured and domesticated? What if… we swapped places with plants?

I grew up close to nature. Myths, legends, folklore of different peoples spellbound me. Flora is a roman goddess of flowers, spring, vegetation, and fertility, a symbol for nature and plants. Alkonost, Gamayun, and Sirin are the most beloved and respected mythical creatures in Russian folklore. They appear as birds with the head and a chest of a beautiful maiden, living in the gardens near paradise. They represent our deepest human emotions: joy, sadness, wisdom, love, lust, luck… My latest works investigate the “inner garden” of a person, the imaginary world, the parallel reality. The worlds of plants and humans are inseparable, we are one, we grow each other, within each other. Garden is not just the place outside we come to rest, enjoy, and contemplate nature, but the place within our minds and souls, which we create for our spiritual recumbence, or for the peaceful and invigorating retreat, for meditation or as a place to hide from the outside world. Is your garden full of sunlight, flowers, bees, and birds or is it shady, mossy, and quiet? it is totally up to you. According to the rules of imagination, your garden can change to whatever you want or need it to be at a given moment.

We all carry an ancient wisdom within us, which we can turn to any time we are looking for answers, we just must find that secret garden in our souls or create it from scratch, wherever that wisdom shell resides. I believe in the healing qualities of art. I hope my art brings solace, joy, and inspiration to the viewer.

I find great pleasure and joy in working with acrylic paints and inks. They allow me to use the combination of fine elaborated patterns and realistic images with bold abstract techniques, such as liquid painting, and watercolor effects. Vibrant “happy” colors, awakening the visual senses of a viewer, are essential.

There are many creative geniuses whom I admire and who have affected the way I have developed as an artist. I still turn to their works for inspiration and to create the MOOD in which I work most productively. Among them are not only artists, but great composes and writers: Francis Picabia, Victor Vasarely,  M.C.Escher, F.Hundertwasser, Lewis Carroll,  Antonio Vivaldi, Johann Bach, and Pyotr Tchaikovsky to name a few.

Luba Holland is the Bronze Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for artists. To see the full body of work and profile, get a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.lubaholland.com

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Hattie Benjamin

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see this in print, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

https://instagram.com/hattie_benjamin_art/

ArtAscent Gardens exhibition Distinguished Writer

Catherine Hamrick

Plant Your Beans on Good Friday

British novels fed my student imagination. I longed to wander the moors in a black dress or watch waves pound a rocky shore in Cornwall. I went to England and raced from castles to cathedrals, taking copious notes on period architecture and stained glass….

Distinguished Writer of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

https://randomstoryteller.com/

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Corrima

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Jackie DiLorenzo

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.jackiedilorenzo.com

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Leah Dockrill

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.leahdockrill.net

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Theodore Heublein

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.theodoreheubleinart.com

ArtAscent Gardens exhibition Distinguished Writer

Marian Kaplun Shapiro

Gardening

If
lovesongs grew fragrant blossoms, flowers
would find ways to rhyme. Bells would bloom
in gardens of as long as we both shall live…

Distinguished Writer of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Rich DiSilvio

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

http://richdisilvio.com

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Evilo

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.evilo.fr

ArtAscent Gardens exhibition Distinguished Writer

Karla Linn Merrifield

Triptych: Hollyhock Profusion

In the Higher Elevations of Hope

picture me slumped, daydreaming in a red canvas chair in a walled New Mexican garden, warm adobe against violet shadows cast by ancient aspen, but in the Taos sun beneath empyrean’s cerulean…

Distinguished Writer of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Tara Mann

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.latenightabstract.ca

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

sherylin bury vilela

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Artist Statement

In setting a theme for a body of work I look into how I am seeing the state of the world and how we relate to it through both attachment and disregard. International politics and the environment play a pivotal role in subject matter as much as the pure joy of colour. This passion for colour, my sense of humour and quirkiness drive my style of art. Playing in a variety of mediums gives me the freedom to follow my heart to best convey my meaning.

About My Work

As Covid 19 plagues our survival in an ongoing cycle uniting and dividing populations around the globe as time passes, the vulnerability we face is no less dissimilar to the plight of the oceans’ creatures as they face a bleak environmental future. Evaluating this idea gave rise to a scenario of sea polyps and corals which appear to look in many cases like plants but are in fact of the Kingdom Animalia as we are. Growing singularly yet living like us: Alone and Together. Their uniqueness and incredible beauty are reminiscent of the gloriousness of the flowers and plants we indulge in for scent and design and colour and form. My own garden is a great space to be mindful and contemplative within and is my absolute in between place before I start on any artwork. I love to get my hands in the dirt and feel the earth. As for my job I work with in the fashion business and often find inspiration from the colour and design and tactile nature that is found in materials. I also take any opportunity to reuse and upcycle any materials of any nature that work to tell my story. The first part of this work began with 8 canvases of 60 x 20 that I purchased prior to lockdown and then spent hours watching BBC DVDs of our natural world. These formed a walled garden so to speak. From them I was inspired to further develop the idea into a group of freestanding sea polyps and corals. Some of them represent polyps on the sea floor. Others are imaginary and convey the possibility of future mutated animals as they undergo the stress of living within an environment that is becoming too acid and impacted by disasters, nuclear fallout, and pollution. Only time will tell whether they will become more vulnerable and bleach to death or find some means to evolve into new organisms. Creating my own pigment from the soot of my fireplace evoked for me a comparison of the state of our atmosphere to the state of our choked and clogged lungs as our lifestyle of mass production, consumerism, fossil fuel consumption, and more foul our environment, as well the environments of others.

Sea polyps inhale our carbon dioxide emissions and release them as oxygen, providing up to 25% of our Earth’s requirements. Realizing that we exhale co2 to breathe oxygen and the sea polyps inhale our waste to provide us with the air we breathe, as well as the other gardens on Earth — like the swathes of forests and jungles whose worlds too are fraught — was an enchanting discovery.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see this in print, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Brian Arte

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.brianarte.com

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Ann James Massey

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Artist Statement

From my earliest memories, my passion for detail and admiration for the primitive Flemish and 16th century Dutch masters have been a guiding influence. Since moving to France (a country that cherishes past and present) in 1994, a major focus has become creating that juxtaposition in my subject matter. Into that mix, I am now adding the element of tributes to influencing factors in my life. Even as I create my own style, always, we as artists rest upon the shoulders of those masters who came before us.

About My Work

In 1970, my instructor at the El Paso Art Academy put a black wax pencil in my hand and my path in art was decided. My light touch and patience married perfectly with the medium, and the works I created were well received, winning awards from the first exhibition I entered.

Perhaps due to the engineering background in my family, I easily recognize relationship measurements and negative spaces, allowing fairly accurate proportions to develop quickly. Beginning with a gestural drawing on vellum paper, I refine the image to a detailed fine line drawing. I transfer that rendition by redrawing the lines on the back side (seen through the vellum), then tape it to Bristol paper plate to finish, rubbing the lines on the surface with a rounded blunt instrument thereby transferring a faint image to the final support. After daubing up any excess carbon with a kneaded eraser, I faintly redraw the lines. Next, I apply 40-plus light layers of black Prismacolor pencil lines using a needle-sharp point without any erasing or smearing, gently increasing pressure in the darkest areas.

After twenty years of drawing, selling, exhibiting, and teaching private lessons, I finally discovered the traditional oil painting method I had been searching for. Given my extensive art background, I quickly picked up the methods at the Schuler School of Fine Art in Baltimore.

To create my compositions, I use the same steps as my drawing technique, then transfer the final line drawing to my prepared sapele mahogany board. Grinding my paints using powdered pigments and black oil (cold pressed linseed oil boiled with lead), I also place a thin layer of my hand-made medium (black oil mixed with a gum mastic crystal solution) before each area I am currently painting. The first overall layer on the toned board is in burnt umber creating a sepia rendition to establish values and confirm the composition. That is usually followed by three layers of color. It is finished with a final layer of scumbling and glazing as needed. To achieve delicate, tiny detail I paint using jeweler’s glasses and most often utilize size 000 Winsor & Newton Series 7 Kolinsky Sable brushes. Though I do not apply thick amounts of paint, with each successive layer affected by the prior layers, the final painting has a feeling of surprising depth.

Despite the tight realism, many of my pieces are not actual reproductions of anything I have seen, but rather a composite of various images I have taken over the years, augmented with sketches and imagination. Often, I deliberately flatten and slightly distort perspective, as did the old masters, to create a composition more pleasing to the eye. Everything is created freehand with no mechanical or reproductive means.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see this in print, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

https://annjamesmassey.com

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

O Yemi Tubi (MOYAT)

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Artist Statement

I am a Nigerian-born, American-trained artist with a creative personal style, currently residing in the United Kingdom . I paint in acrylic and watercolour, but my favoured medium is oil paints. My recent paintings were influenced by the political and social upheaval of our world today and the works of the Renaissance artists.

I like to use portrait paintings to tell the stories about my subjects as did Professor Wole Soyinka, 1986 Nobel Prize Winner in Literature, in painting SOYINKA: An Africans’ Literary Icon, PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST, and THE VIOLINIST.

About My Work

1) GELE (African Head Wrap) Vintage and Modern

In my recent painting, I placed the Nigerian National Theatre building, one of the noticeable landmarks in Lagos, Nigeria where Gele is popularly worn, in the background view through a window. In the foreground is my mother at a table, representing an era when ladies took pride in having the skills to tie their own Geles, literarily and figuratively. It was an era when women took pride in being able to feed their families. A modern lady sits across from her, made up in my usual style of rose and thorns, and dressed in modernized African wear. She is browsing a Pinterest fashion page, popular with some African ladies for choosing their fashion styles. The blouse of the modern lady in this painting is less than half the size of the blouses worn by African women in earlier years.

The skills of tying Gele as well as other cultural attributes that used to be the pride of African women are disappearing. This painting is an homage to my mother and to all the industrious African mothers of earlier era. They spent quality time with their children while working to support their families. They carried their children on their backs while working on the farms or managing their trading stalls. The artist’s mum carried her child on her back, a tray of fabrics balanced on her heard as she sold door-to-door to provide for her family.

It is great that modern African ladies can boast of having billions of followers and likes on social media, but the followers and likes that really count are those of the members of their families. Modern African women, be virtuous women. Embrace the modern trends but don’t neglect the rich virtues of African heritage.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see this in print, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.

www.o-yemi-tubi.pixels.com

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Gabriele Maurus

ArtAscent Distinguished Artist of the 2021 Garden call for artists.

Distinguished Artist of the ArtAscent Gardens call for entry. To see the full body of work, grab a copy of the ArtAscent Art & Literature Journal Gardens issue.